Women in Tech: 3 Women Changing the Industry

Women in Tech: 3 Women Changing the Industry

Women are making a killing in the tech industry! Whether it’s in coding, gaming, social media, or computers women have recently succeeded immensely in broadening the overall perspective and influencing the tech industry in ways we have never seen.  We here at Phonetic give props when they are due, and it’s only right to highlight three women, for everyday left in the week, in the industry making an awesome impact!

1. CEO of YouTube, Susan Wojcicki

In 2012, she became the CEO of YouTube. Before landing this position she worked for Google as the company’s first marketing manager, in 1999. After being successful on various projects she was promoted throughout the company. She became the Senior Vice President of Advertising and Commerce and led the Adwords, Adsense, DoubleClick, and Google Analytics efforts. In addition to her work accomplishments, Susan Wojcicki has been called “the most important person in advertising, and was named in the Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in 2015.
For original source go here.

2. CEO of Yahoo!, Marissa Mayer

In 2012, she became the CEO of Yahoo!. Marissa Mayer started her career working for Google in 1999 as its 20th employee, and the company’s first female engineer. Through her hard work and attention to detail, she was later promoted to Vice President of Search Products and User Experience. After years of working for Google she needed a change. She was selected as Yahoo’s CEO. During the first 14 months of her appointment she acquired Tumblr and doubled Yahoo’s stock price. In addition to her pioneering the way for women in the tech industry, Marissa Mayer has also been named in the Fortune Magazine’s annual list of America’s 50 Most Powerful Women in Business in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013. 

For original source go here.

3. Founder of Girls Who Code, Reshma Saujani

In 2012, she founded Girls Who Code, a nonprofit organization that works to educate young women about computer technology and prevent the gender gap in the technology industry. Starting her career in law she moved on to politics and aided with Hillary Clinton’s 2008 campaign for president. After aiding with the campaign she decided to run for the 2010 House elections. Although she lost to Carolyn Maloney her campaign was known as the first political campaign to use technology tools such as Square, NationBuilder, and Fast Society. A year after founding her nonprofit Reshma Saujani wrote a book titled Women Who Don’t Wait in Line: Break the Mold, Lead the Way. Her efforts in teaching young girls computing and programming skills are not only helping girls today, but will also pave the way for young girls in technology in the future.

For original source go here.

These women have done a great job in their careers thus far. The next best decision they could make is wearing a pair of our eyeglasses :-).